• 7Comments
    Spinal Hierarchy Primer: The Language and Best Function of Your Spine – Pro Episode #79

    Spinal Hierarchy Primer: The Language and Best Function of Your Spine – Pro Episode #79

    09/22/2014

    Like the archetypal positions of your shoulders and hips, there also exists a “root movement language” for your spine. The function of your spine can be thought of in terms of the “best” shape for a given task. For example it’s hard to perform a back flip or smash a volley ball at the net with the same spinal position you use dead lift or squat. Or, creating rotation in a golf swing will be a disaster if it’s performed with the spinal shapes typically associated with shouldering a stone (or texting on your iphone.) When we instruct beginners, or…

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    The 500th Video; Great Sub-Scap Shoulder Smash Drill

    The 500th Video; Great Sub-Scap Shoulder Smash Drill

    11/29/2012

    Hey Leopard Legion, Today’s MWod episode is a great fix for those pesky tight tissues of your armpit/scap region.  When athletes are missing basic range of motion (Ie. they are dys-supple) the body has to account for force generation in those compromised and compensated positions.  For example, if your shoulder sits anterior in the socket (Delta-Bravo shoulder postion) muscles of your rotator cuff like the subscapularis have to work in really horrific positions.  This is one of the reasons why poor positioning begets poor mobility (it’s a wonderfully developed positive feed back loop that creates work for doctors, physios, chiros,…

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    What Your Bent Elbows Really Mean: Elbow Pain and Instability

    What Your Bent Elbows Really Mean: Elbow Pain and Instability

    10/08/2012

    Hey Supple Leopards, Today’s mission is to explore the relationship of “bent elbows” and  shoulder instability.  When athletes are working overhead and missing full range, they will often bend their elbows in an attempt to buy their shoulders some capsular/positional slack.  The additional shoulder range created by bending the elbow and by extension, internally rotating the shoulder joint allows for full physiological shoulder flexion.  However, shoulder stability is sacrificed in the process and the joint is rendered unstable and the shoulder girdle musculature  positionally inhibited (not to mention the poor, poor, innocent elbow that is essentially gunned down in the…